SoundGarden

SoundGarden

SoundGarden is an installation that produced rainbow chard along with the sounds of the hydroponic growth process. Several handmade microphones were used including a hydrophone that broadcast the inner workings of this "plant machine". The captured sounds were reminiscent of "chirping" insects....virtual insects for an synthetic garden. 35 pounds of organic rainbow chard was harvested and donated to a local homeless shelter during this wintertime residency at the Prairie Center of the Arts.

Deep Water Culture Root Development

Deep Water Culture Root Development

Many works such as this fully functional hydroponic community garden blurs the boundaries between utility and the aesthetic, functionalism and symbolism. I enjoy the challenge of transgressing boundaries between art, architecture, landscape, and design.

Hydro Garden

Hydro Garden

In the more recent past, many grew their own food in the Victory Garden as seen in the great depression and WWII. However, Victory Gardens have been around for quite a long time. The term dates back to a book entitled "Victory Garden" that was written in 1603 by Englishman Richard Gardner in response to concerns of a Spanish invasion. He believed cities under siege would need gardens to provide for the citizenry and considered gardening a civic duty.

SoundGarden

SoundGarden

Students from various departments take part in harvesting herbs grown from this site responsive & sound emitting hydroponic garden on the last day of this solo exhibition.

SoundGarden

SoundGarden

With this work the public is also given an opportunity to discuss topics closer to contemporary art. Armagardden recreates natural phenomena through artificial inputs that rely on communal action, conceptual processes, as well as the more formal aspects of design and utility.

SoundGarden

SoundGarden

The specific impact humans have upon each local environment is frequently under communicated. In light of this, Armagardden underscores what scientists and ecologists are trying to make known through research and publication.

Armagardden II

Armagardden II

One of the first places where folks notice the impact of climate change is in their own gardens and backyards, their most common point of intersection with the natural world. For many, the costs and disruptions of mobility have become too much to bear. Value must be shifted closer to home creating re-investment in the local community. In the near future, economics will become more place-based and this will aid the re-establishment of more locally-based food systems.

SoundGarden

SoundGarden

With this work the public is also given an opportunity to discuss topics closer to contemporary art. Armagardden recreates natural phenomena through artificial inputs that rely on communal action, conceptual processes, as well as the more formal aspects of design and utility.

Simple Bubbler for Oxygen and Sound

Simple Bubbler for Oxygen and Sound

Mills from Recycled Earthenware

Mills from Recycled Earthenware

A do-it-yourself ball mill created from cast off machinery recycles earthenware/terra-cotta refuse into a growth medium or a substitute for normal soil. The ball mill grinds reclaimed clay into small spheres that are fired to 1200’C. Ceramics as a growth medium is PH neutral, porous and lightweight, does not compact, and is completely reusable once sterilized. This kind of medium drains freely and does not hold excessive water providing good oxygen levels for root development.

Hydroponic Gardens